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      Inside The Vessel
    1. Boys Noize says he wrote a hit with Lady Gaga. Speaking to Boiler Room, the German electronic music producer and DJ, real name Alexander Ridha, praised the “Million Reasons” singer as one of the most down-to-earth artists he has ever worked with and revealed that they recorded a song for one of Gaga’s upcoming projects. “[Lady Gaga] is so cool,” he said. “She is definitely one of the coolest artists I met that is ridiculously famous, but so down to the ground. She asked me, ‘You know [UK techno DJ] Surgeon?’ and I was like, ‘Are you f—ing with me?’, and she was like ‘Yeah, he’s my friend, he opened some of my shows.'” He continued: “She’s down to techno and what’s crazy is that she got into modular stuff too. I brought my modular system—and she spilled water on it, by the way—but it broke the ice and then we wrote a f—ing hit. But now she’s into modular, she bought a system, and we used that on some of her songs.” Lady Gaga is currently busy working on at least three upcoming albums: a follow up to the 2014 jazz collection Cheek to Cheek with Tony Bennett, the soundtrack for her debut film A Star Is Born with Bradley Cooper, and her fifth solo studio album, which is rumored to be released in 2019. Source.
    2. Lady Gaga's cover of 'I Want Your Love' which we already heard a first version on the Tom Ford commercial, will be released on Chic's new album! Nile Rodgers just confirmed on Facebook.
    3. Lady Gaga is five-foot two inches tall and still growing. “I’m actually five-foot three and three quarters,” she clarified at Saturday’s MTV Movie and TV Awards. The New York-born pop magnet, whose “Gaga: Five Foot Two” won best music documentary at the MTV event, has been largely out of the public eye since ending her Joanne World Tour in January, which grossed over $95 million in ticket sales. Sitting backstage after the MTV taping, draped in black, she tells Variety she’s been holed up in the studio, readying for what could be the most pivotal year of her career, which will see her first major movie role in “A Star Is Born” opposite Bradley Cooper, a two-year Las Vegas residency that kicks off in December, and oh yeah, she’s working on a new album. “I’m just always making music, I’ve always been that way and I think you see in ‘Five Foot Two’ that I’m a studio rat,” the 32 year-old says. Netflix and Live Nation’s cinéma vérité-style doc, released in September, featured Gaga in her most vulnerable state yet, from rehearsing a high-wire performance at the Super Bowl to more down to earth moments like cooking at home, sitting poolside, topless, skewering “bulls-t” men and having a meltdown on the set of “American Horror Story.” “All my insecurities are gone, I don’t feel insecure about who am I as a woman,” she says in the doc. She tells Variety, “I made a decision really early on that I wanted Chris (Moukarbel, the film’s director) to have full access to me and my life. I just blocked the cameras out so they could capture the realities of my life.” Moukarbel’s raw look at the global superstar also chronicled her battle with fibromyalgia and chronic pain, stemming from a hip injury she suffered three years ago that eventually cut her European tour short. She hopes by revealing the invisible illness it helps raise awareness and tackle ignorance about the disease. “To anyone that doesn’t believe in fibromyalgia: I dare you to spend five minutes in my body on a day when I’m in pain, and then try and say it again,” she said of her condition. Moukarbel, who has directed a handful of docs, including HBO’s “Banksy Does New York,” said his intention was never to make a movie about fame. “I think it happens to be a documentary about an artist who is famous. She has an opportunity to do a lot of things that other people haven’t. At the same time it also comes with all of these other conditions that she has to work against to make her art.” “I wouldn’t call it a compromise,” Gaga says of her immersive lifestyle, “It’s more of a special gift called passion. And I’m just so passionate and what keeps me going is being inside the vortex of my art and creating and making things that are not only meaningful to me but hopefully to other people.“ “When I’m with Tony Bennett, and we hang out, we always joke that we never work a day. Because we love what we do.” Source
    4. Before the invasion of disco sticks and leotards, before Born This Way birthed a new breed of superfan and Joanne galloped away with the world’s collective heart, the first chapter in the legend of Lady Gaga’s career rested on little more than a throwback beat and a wide-eyed girl with nothing to lose and only pop cultural domination to gain. Now, one decade after Gaga splashed onto the scene with her debut single “Just Dance” (and ushered in a new era of glistening electro-pop on mainstream radio), EW caught up with its creators — longtime Gaga producer RedOne and recording artist Akon, who helped launch Gaga’s career via his KonLive record label — to celebrate the track’s 10th birthday on April 8. Below, the pair dishes on the songwriting process that almost placed “Just Dance” in the hands of other artists, why Akon’s smooth, featured vocals were replaced by newcomer Colby O’Donis’ on the final version, and what the success of the song means to them. [EW contacted Gaga’s team for an interview, but a representative indicated she was unavailable to contribute to this article.] REDONE: At that time, I just did my first hit with Kat DeLuna called “Whine Up.” After that hit, I told my management that I wanted to work with established artists. But they called me and said, “Hey, we [want you to work with] this girl…. She’s talented if you want to meet her for five minutes.”…. I met her outside of the Sony building in New York, and I liked the vibe I was getting! She was like, “Oh my God, I love ‘Whine Up!’” [Laughs]. In those five minutes, I felt like she was so special. And those five minutes turned into a few sessions. [Despite multiple attempts, EW could not reach Vincent Herbert for comment.] REDONE: We were talking about rock like Mötley Crüe, you know, “Girls, girls, girls!” but we needed “Boys, boys, boys!” instead…and that created the sounds for the whole album. For “Just Dance,” I wanted to do a rock song with big drums but instead of guitars, it’s synths. That’s what “Just Dance” is! The opening [synths] are like a guitar chord…. [I began] taking her to every session I had with other artists, too, but as a writer. And every artist got scared of her and asked me to not bring her again. I remember telling her, “Gaga, you’re an incredible artist and they feel your energy!” She was so creative, giving them ideas about how to dress and how to behave, and they started feeling so small. And Gaga started crying, like, “I just want to help them!” I said, “Yes, but keep those ideas for yourself. You’re an incredible artist.” In one of those sessions, I presented her to an [industry friend] named Efe, and the first time I played her music he was like, “Oh my God, this girl is the next Madonna!” AKON: I [was struck by] her in general. When I see a star, I just know it. From the moment she walked in [for our first meeting], her appearance and her attitude felt brand new and fresh. She was so fearless. When I [had discussions with] Jimmy Iovine, from that moment everything ignited. We got excited about her, started making records, and started to craft her image. At that time, she was doing jazz-type music, and I think she needed someone to hear it all the way out and see what made sense with her idea, her look, and then pairing her with music that meshed it all into one platform. REDONE: After that, we did all the [iconic] songs: “Just Dance,” “Poker Face,” “LoveGame”…and Akon said, “Red, hold on to that file. Don’t give it to anybody until I come for it, because I want to take these songs to Jimmy so we can make her a priority!” AKON: I was contracted to do songs for The Pussycat Dolls and I had writer’s block the day of, so I asked RedOne if we could collaborate together to open our minds…and “Just Dance” was originally going to be submitted for The Pussycat Dolls. When we finished, there was no way “Just Dance” could be for them. REDONE: We met with Jimmy and he heard the songs. He said, “I love the song. Can I give [it] to The Pussycat Dolls?” And Akon was like, “No! It’s Gaga! She can be the next big thing!” Jimmy said, “Okay, but one thing: I have a problem with [Gaga’s similarities to] her highness.” I was like, “Who is her highness?” And he said, “Gwen Stefani. She reminds me of Gwen Stefani.’” And Akon goes, “No, she’s totally different!” [EW spoke to Iovine. Though he did not want to be quoted directly for this story, he felt that both Akon and RedOne were correct in expressing a desire to keep the song for Gaga.] AKON: Literally every song that we wrote was done within 30 minutes to an hour. It was all chemistry. The Fame was done in 30 days: mixed, mastered, and ready to push out. That was another reason I was so excited about working with her, because the ideas and things she sparked were so fresh. We opened our minds and tried everything. No bars, no barriers, whatever we felt that felt good, whatever we wanted to say, we said it. It was the first time she had no one telling her what she should be doing or how she should be doing it. REDONE: She reminded me of an artist who was the whole inspiration of the Gaga sound — her name is Leila K, from Sweden back in the day. I said, “Gaga, I want to play for you this artist because if we can do what she did and make it now, it can change the world.” That’s how I wanted to do an album that was different at the time for everybody — with synths, big drums, big hooks — but with the attitude of Gaga inspired by Leila K. AKON: I featured on the song originally, but Universal didn’t clear my vocals. [Several contacts at Universal and Interscope did not respond to EW’s request for comment.] It was a crazy moment…so I got Colby O’Donis to feature on it and do my verse. But, I kept my background vocals on the song, because background vocals aren’t considered a “feature.” There was a lot of politics going on, a huge competition between Interscope and [parent company] Universal, and I like to think that because I claimed my record deal at Interscope instead of [directly with] Universal, where I was actually signed as an artist, they were kind of getting me back for that. It was so political that I didn’t want to fight it. The song was done, finished, ready to go all the way until two days before we shot the video, and that’s when we got the notice that we couldn’t get clearance. It was a huge shock to Gaga [because] this was her first megaproject and her first real moment! [O’Donis did not respond to requests for comment.] REDONE: The melody is so good anyway. Whoever heard it didn’t care if it was Akon or not. They just heard a good song. It was written as a good song. REDONE: We dropped it [on April 8, 2008], and it took a long time for people to love it. It wasn’t accepted in America, [but] she became No. 3 right away in Sweden because that’s the country of pop and they loved it! AKON: My motto has always been to not put a label on any record, and let it find its own audience. That was one of the biggest challenges, even in the beginning, and why it took so long for it to hit on radio. We tried working radio in the U.S., and they didn’t bite because it was an ‘80s-sounding record, and that wasn’t the [popular] sound at that time. “Just Dance” didn’t fit the format. It wasn’t a song that a DJ could play before or after any song that was a top hit at that moment. We flew out to the U.K. and tried to do things over there, but it didn’t work. When we went to Canada, that’s when it hit. There’s an international crowd there that’s more daring as far as what they’re willing to listen to [and] Gaga whipped their airwaves. Then, the U.S. caught it and it changed the whole game and created a new movement, [especially] on the West Coast and in San Francisco, where the crowds were really eclectic and gave her a shot. The gay community was the one that actually was like, “This record is a f—ing anthem!” and they supported her from that moment, and that became her core audience. From there, everyone else caught the wave. AKON: Everything on the radio sounded exactly the same…you had a brand new artist coming out with something fresh! [We didn’t] try to A&R it. We let the audience choose. That was [what I said] to every station that I went to. I was like, “I know you guys have a specific playlist that you set up, but can this one record that doesn’t sound like anything else be chosen by the audience? Just give us a fair shot! You don’t have to give us a full-time rotation, just play it one time a week. Give it to the audience raw and let them make the decision!” It took almost a year to pop [in the U.S.] When we did the Interscope promo tour, we didn’t get a full [run], so I took her on my personal promo tour for my album. We couldn’t give up. I refused to because I knew she was a big star; it was just a matter of the stations giving her a fair chance. I’m happy I did that. At the end of the day, it opened up for a new genre and wave of music. It was worth the fight! REDONE: Every time I hear it, it’s like yesterday. It’s so beautiful. It’s the song that changed our lives. The lyrics are Gaga. I can’t take any credit for the genius lyrics. It comes to her so fast. I love perfection and she gives you perfection every time. She’s a machine! It spoiled me because everybody I was working with that was talented and globally known, they [couldn’t] match how Gaga spoiled me with class and genius lyrics. I helped her with words here and there, but I can’t say I wrote or co-wrote the “Just Dance” lyrics. but I can take credit for melodies, chord progressions, and production. AKON: The artists that have the door open to be themselves are the ones that win. Their opinions should be the first thing that matters. The moment record companies get involved and try to tell you to go in one direction for this sound or to try something else for a certain amount of hit records, that’s bulls—t. It’s about if you bring something fresh and new to the game and it works, everyone else is going to cling on and try to do the same. If you’re the creator, you have the longevity in the business and it gives you the creativity and freedom to try something else new and fresh, and it always works. REDONE: People always tell me, “Oh my God, I thought she was saying red wine!” This is the story of my life, that the world thinks she’s saying “red wine!” Especially because Gaga sings, “I’ve had a little bit too much” at the start. People think she’s talking about alcohol! Like she had a little bit too much red wine. I’m still happy that we made history, so I don’t care! It’s a beautiful thing I was a part of. We created history that will last forever. Source
    5. When Bradley Cooper went to Desert Trip in October of 2016, he didn't view the festival as a casting opportunity for his upcoming Lady Gaga–starring directorial debut A Star Is Born. But then Neil Young took the stage and Cooper's eyes wandered over to his guitarist, Lukas Nelson. Not only was the 27-year-old son of Willie Nelson crushing everything Young threw at him – from a gentle, acoustic "Comes a Time" to a wild, frenetic "Cowgirl in the Sand" – but he looked like a movie star while doing it. His band Promise of the Real continue their musical explorations on the road with Young – and never want it to stop "Bradley is a huge Neil Young fan," says Nelson on the phone from Australia where he's playing festivals with his band Promise of the Real. "He looked at me and said to himself, 'I want this guy to teach me how to present myself as a musician in this movie.'" Nelson was originally just contracted to be a music consultant, but once he began writing with Gaga they discovered such a great chemistry that Cooper brought him and Promise of the Real on board to serve as his character's onscreen backing band. "We just had the look he was going for," says Nelson. "And it just kind of kept going." Lukas grew so close to Lady Gaga that she agreed to sing background vocals on his song "Carolina," which appears on Lukas Nelson and Promise of the Real's 2017 self-titled LP. Check out a new video for it below. What did you learn from your acting experience in A Star Is Born? The hours are a lot worse than musician's hours. [Laughs] That's a lot of hurry up and wait. As musicians, we get a lot of time off. It's a blessing. That said, I do think I'll be doing more acting in my life. It'll be down the road since music is always my first priority. I'm sure when you formed your band back in the day you never imagine you'd be backing Lady Gaga in a big Hollywood movie. Exactly. I never had that in my head in any way, shape or form. But years ago, Bob Dylan did offer me a job to go on the road. I sat in with him [in 2004] and he made the offer afterwards, though my mom forbade it. That was OK since I was working on developing my own band and I was playing with dad. My mom wanted me to stay in school. Back then I said to myself, "Well, if that ever happens again. If there's anybody besides Bob, because that ship sailed, but if Neil [Young] were to ever call and asked me to play with him, I would." What inspired "Carolina?" We've played there quite a few times and every time I'm surprised at how much I just really love it and how beautiful it is. The people there love music so much. I just find it to be a fantastic place. I wanted to write a song about it. How did Gaga wind up singing on it? She came over the studio one time and we played it for her and she loved it. She was like, "I hear these harmonies," and I said, "Well, go put 'em on there." And she did. That's just kind of how it went. It was real natural. What's it like to write with her? Oh, she fantastic. I really feel like our brains work similarly in music. She's just a super talent. It's like a dream come true. She's a fantastic human being. She's a really great person. How was she different than how you imagined her? I knew she was on the level when I saw her with Tony Bennett. I mean, I knew she was an actual musician rather than a just a pop star. Source.
    6. In a recent interview, Oscar winner Jennifer Lawrence, spoke about her friend Bradley Cooper and the film he is currently producing: "A Star Is Born" starring Lady Gaga. Jennifer praised the movie describing it as "phenomenal". You can hear the full interview below (skip to 53:00). Lady Gaga's movie with Bradley Cooper is set to be released on October 5th.
    7. Here's an updated look at the superstar's U.S. sales, according to Nielsen Music. Albums The Fame, 4.79 million; Born This Way, 2.42 million; The Fame Monster (EP), 1.64 million; ARTPOP, 775,000; Cheek to Cheek (with Tony Bennett), 760,000; Joanne, 616,000; The Remix, 315,000; Born This Way: The Remix, 62,000; A Very Gaga Holiday, 45,000 Top-Selling Songs "Poker Face," 7.5 million; "Just Dance" (feat. Colby O'Donis), 7.2 million; "Bad Romance," 5.8 million; "Born This Way," 4.2 million; "Paparazzi," 3.6 million; "Telephone" (feat. Beyonce), 3.5 million; "The Edge of Glory" 3 million; "Applause," 2.7 million; "LoveGame," 2.66 million; "Alejandro," 2.62 million; "You and I," 2.4 million; "Do What U Want" (feat. R. Kelly), 1.3 million; and (fittingly), "Million Reasons," 1.1 million "Judas" is next in line to become Lady Gaga's next million-selling download, as it's currently within a nominal amount from the milestone. Lady Gaga's U.S. totals stand at 10.7 (error on the article, actual total is 11,4M) million albums sold and 56.2 million in digital song sales, as well as 2.6 billion on-demand song streams and 35.9 billion in cumulative airplay audience. EDIT: they finally changed the total: Lady Gaga's U.S. totals stand at 11.46 million albums sold and 56.2 million in digital song sales, as well as 2.6 billion on-demand song streams and 35.9 billion in cumulative airplay audience. https://www.billboard.com/articles/columns/chart-beat/8218920/-lady-gaga-sales-number-2-hot-100-hits-ed-sheeran-record-ask-billboard
    8. Donatella Versace is one of the fashion industry's most recognizable figures. Versace's fans call her an icon, a title that was further established at the Fashion Awards hosted in London at the end of last year when she received the Fashion Icon award. The moment capped off a successful year for Versace's artistic director who wowed the fashion industry and fans online when she staged a special tribute to her late brother, and the brand's founder, Gianni Versace, during the label's Spring-Summer 2018 show during Milan Fashion week in September. Marking 20 years since her brother's murder in 1997, the show brought together Cindy Crawford, Naomi Campbell, Claudia Schiffer, Helena Christensen and Carla Bruni, who walked arm in arm down the catwalk during the finale as George Michael's "Freedom" played. On the eve of the latest round of shows during Milan Fashion Week, Donatella Versace's name and image remain firmly in the public eye, with Ryan Murphy's "American Crime Story: The Assassination of Gianni Versace," in which Penelope Cruz plays the role of Donatella Versace, undoubtedly contributing to the spike in interest. But it's her contribution to the fashion industry and influence extending far beyond the sector that makes Donatella Versace an icon in the eyes of many. The sheer green, navel-deep dress that she designed for Jennifer Lopez for the 2000 Grammy Awards is regarded as the reason Google Image Search exists. More recently, she created all of the costumes for Lady Gaga's 2012-2013 "Born this Way" tour. And in 2015 she modeled Ricardo Tisci's Autumn-Winter 2015 Givenchy campaign. Tisci, who was creative director of Givenchy at the time said in a statement, "I approached my friend Donatella because she represents what a Fashion Icon is to me." As part of a series of features commissioned by CNN Style's guest editor Claudia Schiffer, Donatella Versace stars in an exclusive film directed by Ivan Olita and narrated by Lady Gaga. The video, featuring cameos from model Gigi Hadid and British Vogue editor Edward Enninful among others, is a playful tribute to Donatella Versace, the icon. Watch the video here - source.
    9. Lady Gaga - Joanne Tour: US $94.911.783 gross — US $1.936.975 841.935 tickets — 17.182 49 / 49 49 $112.73 Live Nation 4 Lady Gaga Palau Sant Jordi Barcelona, Spain Jan. 14, 16, 2018 $2,113,298 28,918 / 28,918 2 / 2 $128.24, $45.19 Live Nation Global Touring/Live Nation Spain 5 Lady Gaga Ziggo Dome Amsterdam, Netherlands Jan. 20, 2018 $1,465,089 15,397 / 15,397 1 / 1 $146.66, $48.89 Live Nation Global Touring/Mojo Concerts 6 Lady Gaga Sportpaleis Antwerp, Belgium Jan. 22, 2018 $1,435,452 15,533 / 15,533 1 / 1 $134.87, $49.04 Live Nation Global Touring/Live Nation Belgium 7 Lady Gaga Arena Birmingham Birmingham, U.K. Jan. 31, 2018 $1,138,126 12,456 / 12,456 1 / 1 $148.45, $56.55 Live Nation Global Touring/Live Nation UK 8 Lady Gaga Mediolanum Forum Milan, Italy Jan. 18, 2018 $1,109,390 11,170 / 11,170 1 / 1 $134.63, $48.95 Live Nation Global Touring/Live Nation Italy 12 Lady Gaga Barclaycard Arena Hamburg, Germany Jan. 24, 2018 $1,055,950 10,587 / 10,587 1 / 1 $136.19, $49.52 Live Nation Global Touring/Live Nation GmbH 14 Lady Gaga Genting Arena Birmingham, U.K. Feb. 1, 2018 $799,708 9,522 / 9,522 1 / 1 $149.44, $56.93 Live Nation Global Touring/Live Nation UK
    10. Tbh most of the fans are right, not the ones with insults, but the ones who were waiting for her @ Rock In Rio for example, I mean idk, European fans, Montreal fans, all had rescheduled shows... but not Brazilian... I mean even if Live Nation doesn't get profit, it's just 'respect' for her fan, that's only my opinion
    11. A video surfaced online of Lady Gaga’s manager, Bobby Campbell, being asked if the Joanne World Tour was coming to Asia and Latin America and fans all over the world were quick to react to his answer. In Spanish, Bobby replied “no,” but mistakingly followed up with “Come to Vegas” when he meant to say “We’ll be in Vegas.” This sent Latin American fans into a frenzy. Bobby reacted to the controversy today on his Instagram account and apologized for his misuse of the language stating that his Spanish isn’t perfect and that he is sorry. You can join the discussion on our forum!
    12. Photos We are plastic + Black Jesus DEMOS

      Screaming at that Black Jesus demo
    13. An old demo by Lady Gaga called 'We Are Plastic' leaked on the web in high quality some days ago! The track was written in 2007, during The Fame pre-era, by Lady Gaga and Rob Fusari. You can listen to it below: Press play from your browser and make sure to close any unwanted adds. On the same day, an early concept demo of Lady Gaga's Black Jesus (Amen Fashion) from her album Born This Way has also leaked. You can hear it below. Press play from your browser and make sure to close any unwanted adds. Make sure to join the discussion on our forum!
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