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    A Star Is Born soundtrack available to pre-order

    The soundtrack for Lady Gaga and Bradley Cooper's upcoming film "A Star Is Born" is now available to pre-order on iTunes! It consists of original music by Lady Gaga and Bradley Cooper, and sneaks in a few classic covers. Collaborators include Luke Nelson and Promise Of The Real, DJ White Shadow and Diane Warren. The album will be released the same day as the film, on October 5th. Check out the full tracklist below:
    1 Intro Cast       2 Black Eyes Bradley Cooper       3 Somewhere Over the Rainbow (Dialogue) Cast       4 Fabulous French (Dialogue) Cast       5 La Vie en rose Lady Gaga       6 I'll Wait for You (Dialogue) Cast       7 Maybe It's Time Bradley Cooper       8 Parking Lot (Dialogue) Cast       9 Out of Time Bradley Cooper       10 Alibi Bradley Cooper       11 Trust Me (Dialogue) Cast       12 Shallow       13 First Stop, Arizona (Dialogue) Cast       14 Music to My Eyes       15 Diggin' My Grave       16 I Love You (Dialogue) Cast       17 Always Remember Us This Way Lady Gaga       18 Unbelievable (Dialogue) Cast       19 How Do You Hear It? (Dialogue) Cast       20 Look What I Found Lady Gaga       21 Memphis (Dialogue) Cast       22 Heal Me Lady Gaga       23 I Don't Know What Love Is       24 Vows (Dialogue) Cast       25 Is That Alright? Lady Gaga       26 SNL (Dialogue) Cast       27 Why Did You Do That? Lady Gaga       28 Hair Body Face Lady Gaga       29 Scene 98 (Dialogue) Cast       30 Before I Cry Lady Gaga       31 Too Far Gone Bradley Cooper       32 Twelve Notes (Dialogue) Cast       33 I'll Never Love Again (Film Version)       34 I'll Never Love Again (Extended Version) You can Pre-Order the soundtrack and pre-save it on Spotify/Apple Music here.

    LA Times interviewed Lady Gaga for 'A Star is Born'.

    She walked downstairs and there he was, staring at her. He stepped toward her, examined her face: concealer, mascara, rouge.
    “Take it off,” Bradley Cooper told Lady Gaga.
    She noticed something in his hand. It was a makeup wipe. With it, he erased the colors from her forehead down to her chin.
    This is the woman Cooper wanted in his film, “A Star Is Born.” Not the pop star masked with face paint and headdresses and hairpieces. Just Stefani Germanotta. “Completely open,” he said. “No artifice.”
    Until that moment in 2016, during a screen test in her home, Gaga didn’t realize how much she wanted the part — one played by Janet Gaynor, Judy Garland and Barbra Streisand before her. And to get it, she was going to have to “completely let go and trust” Cooper. She couldn’t be that girl from the Lower East Side who spent hours doing her makeup before her gigs. She had to let the camera zoom in on her face wearing chapstick and eight-hour cream and nothing else.
    “It put me right in the place I needed to be, because when my character talks about how ugly she feels — that was real,” Gaga recalls. “I’m so insecure. I like to preach, but I don’t always practice what I preach.”
    Just days before flying to Italy for the world premiere of “A Star Is Born” at the Venice Film Festival, Gaga was sitting in the living room of her Malibu home — a $23-million, six-acre estate with a two-lane bowling alley, dressage ring and safe room. The movie, Cooper’s directorial debut, is the fourth version of the story to be made for the big screen. In this latest take, which will be released by Warner Bros. on Oct. 5, Cooper stars as Jackson Maine, a rock ’n’ roll star whose success is at risk as he struggles with drug and alcohol addiction. But his life finds renewed purpose when he meets Ally (Gaga), an aspiring singer who becomes both his creative muse and his girlfriend. Jackson decides to take Ally on tour with him, but as her career takes off, his demons threaten to sabotage their happiness.
    Although she’d already won a Golden Globe for her performance on “American Horror Story” and performed on some of the world’s biggest stages — including at the Oscars and the Grammys — Warner Bros. still wanted Gaga to audition to play Ally.
    “That was the studio — that wasn’t Bradley or the producers, but a former executive at Warner Bros. who wasn’t convinced Gaga should get the role,” explains Bill Gerber, one of the film’s producers who has been attached to the project since 2007, when Clint Eastwood was set to direct it. “So we convinced them. Bradley believed in her, and Warner’s was generous enough to budget a proper screen test. It wasn’t unanimous until we did the test, and when they saw it, it took them seconds to say yes.”
    Gaga says she understood why the studio wanted to test her, noting that some people “don’t really know what I look like.” Anyway, naysayers fuel her: “I’m totally that girl that’s like, ‘Bring it. I’ll show you.’”
    At 17, after studying at the Lee Strasberg Theatre & Film Institute, Gaga was admitted to New York University’s prestigious Collaborative Arts Project 21, a musical theater conservatory and off-Broadway theater company. But she didn’t thrive there. She wasn’t getting auditions, and the ones she went on went poorly. She was almost cast on a domestic tour of “Rent,” but producers ultimately decided she was too young. So after just a year at NYU, she dropped out.
    "I was frustrated with the system,” she says, “so I decided to go off on my own and pay my own rent, work three jobs, make my own music, and record in my apartment.”
    It’s somewhat difficult to envision that version of Gaga as she perches on the edge of her couch, back erect, still wearing the black Alaïa dress and stilettos she put on for a photo shoot earlier that afternoon. The coffee table in front of her is covered with pink crystals and magazines, including one with her on the cover.
    An assistant walks into the living room to offer bottled water. Also floating around Gaga’s house: her manager Bobby Campbell; a member of her publicity team; and her mother, Cynthia Germanotta, who is visiting from New York. Gaga’s French bulldogs are outside on the patio, which overlooks the Pacific, and whine occasionally at the glass sliding doors.
    All of this is being watched from afar by cameras over in the barn, which houses both Gaga’s horses and her security team, which holds cellphones for guests while they are inside the performer’s residence.
    To play Ally, Gaga tried to distance herself from all this. She remembered the little girl who grew up obsessed with Garland — the one who would watch the Oscars wrapped in a gown made of blankets, accepting a fake Oscar on a crate in front of her television. And she thought a lot about how she came up in the music industry when — just like her character — she was told she had the right sound but not the right look.
    “I never cried, but I would just hold on to my records for dear life and say, ‘You’ll pry them from my cold, dead fingers,’” Gaga recalls of her early conversations with music executives. “What made things easier for me is that I wrote my music, so I didn’t have to beg for songs or for anyone to help me. I did it myself.”
    For Ally’s musical performances — some of which were filmed onstage at Coachella the week between Gaga’s two headlining gigs at the 2017 musical festival — she decided to tone things down. She wouldn’t grit her teeth or shout at the audience or throw her hands in the air. And she tried to hone in on the character’s depression, focusing on how close Ally was to giving up her dreams before meeting Jackson.
    “What’s different from Ally than me is that when I wanted to become a singer, I hit the concrete running,” she says. “I was dragging my piano from dive bar to dive bar to play music. I was calling people, faking being my own manager to get gigs. I really believed in myself that I could do this and that I wasn’t going to stop until I made it. ...The truth is, when we meet Ally, she’s given up on herself. And that’s very different from me. I just wasn’t overwhelmed by the odds. The truth is, if we were not sitting here today and I hadn’t sold as many records as I have, I’d still be in a bar somewhere playing the piano and singing. It’s just who I want to be.”
    Gaga worked with acting coach Susan Batson, who has trained Nicole Kidman and Juliette Binoche. The teacher said she found the fledgling actress “exceedingly receptive to the work,” describing her as “almost beyond professional.”
    “It was her first [leading role], but you would have never known it, and I think that has something to do with the fact that she’s done so much performing already,” Batson says. “The Lady Gaga that the public knows? They won’t see her.”
    Getting comfortable on set, Gaga admits, took some time. After months of preparation, she turned up for the first day of shooting with her lines memorized. Cooper came on set to join her in a scene, but he started off by saying a line that wasn’t in the script. He was trying to get Gaga to loosen up, but she didn’t understand and responded by saying the same line over and over again.
    “Finally, he said, ‘Are you OK?’ And then I started crying,” she says with a laugh. “Then I got that out of the way and then we did the scene. I had to let go of the words.”
    The two would go on to form a close bond during production, developing a shorthand while working on set. If Cooper wanted Gaga to evoke a feeling of warmth, he’d whisper “Tony,” knowing that she has a close relationship with singer Tony Bennett and that whenever she thinks of him she gets “a certain feeling of love.” If he needed her to focus, he’d say things like “ninja” or “assassin.”
    “Her learning curve was insane, just from the first day to the second day,” Cooper remembers. “Everybody already knows that she’s got a God-given talent as a singer, and she was able to utilize that plutonium to act. If this is something she wants to pursue, I will just have been lucky to have been part of her story as an actress.”
    Gaga also helped inform Cooper’s performance as a musician. She wrote a handful of songs for the movie’s soundtrack and sat with the actor in the studio, answering his questions about the logistics of what goes on backstage during a big concert. She was also candid about her personal experience with drugs, sharing how readily available substances were to her after she became famous.
    “There was a buffet of options,” Gaga says. “It’s very lonely being a performer. There’s a certain loneliness that I feel, anyway — that I’m the only one that does what I do. So it feels like no one understands. And the urge to use is because you’re searching for a way to quell the pain. When I first started to perform around the country doing nightclubs, there was stuff everywhere, but I had already partied when I was younger so I didn’t dabble. I was able to avoid it because I did it when I was a kid.”
    As “A Star Is Born” embarks on the fall awards circuit — the film is headed to the Toronto International Film Festival after Venice — Gaga says she’s proud of her performance because she knows she “gave it everything.” After being forced to cancel a slew of concert dates this year due to her fibromyalgia, she’s readying a return to the stage on Dec. 28, when she’ll launch a Las Vegas residency. (She won’t reveal whether songs from “A Star is Born” will make the cut.)
    She’d like to do more acting, but not just “for the sake of being an actress. I want to tell great stories that pull from real places inside of me, from real pain, from real emotion, from my real life.”
    Gaga does seem to have a gift for easily accessing her emotions. When the conversation returns to self-confidence — how she began to feel beautiful after that early industry scrutiny over her looks — her eyes fill with tears.
    “To be honest, I think what makes me feel beautiful is when I see happiness in my fans,” she says, her voice choking a bit. “When I see or hear from them that the music that I’ve made has changed their life in some way, that’s what makes me feel beautiful. Because this is just the outside, you know? And at the end of the day, I could be in a million movies and put out a million songs and everyone could say, ‘She was so beautiful,’ but that’s not really what I want. I want them to say, ‘I saw that movie and I cried my eyes out and I learned something about myself.’”
     
    Lady Gaga by Jay L. Clendenin for LA Times. Click on the picture to see the full photoshoot.

    This article originally appeared here.

    Lady Gaga's Deposition in Kesha's Lawsuit: ‘“I would Look After Her”.

     
    In recent years, Kesha's legal battle against her former producer and alleged abuser, Dr. Luke, has become one of the most prominent legal battles in the industry, garnering tremendous support across social media, fans and fellow celebrities. In case you're unaware, Kesha came out as a sexual assault victim in 2014, accusing her then producer Dr. Luke of said abuse, thus opening a legal battle against him in hopes of getting out of her multiple album contract with the producer and his record label under Sony.
    As of recently, texts between Kesha and several other female artists in the industry have been made public, including those between herself and Lady Gaga, in which Kesha alleged that her former producer may have also sexually assaulted Katy Perry. 
    On August 27, 2018 Lady Gaga's deposition on aforementioned texts had been made public. In her deposition, she recalls talking with Kesha and CEO of Intercope, John Janick, about a rumor that Mr. Janick had heard regarding Katy Perry's alleged abuse. She states that Mr. Janick and herself had been talking with Kesha about what they could do to help Kesha out from her legal binding with Sony and Dr. Luke's record company, Kemosabe Records, suggesting that somehow they could bring Kesha over to Interscope and that Gaga would look after her. 
    Later on, in his own deposition, Mr. Janick redacted his claims of ever alleging Katy Perry had been raped, making it seem as if Kesha was lying to Gaga with her claim over text, ultimately contradicting both Kesha and Gaga's claims that they had heard the rumor from Mr. Janick and making Gaga's deposition appear to lack knowledge of the subject and evidence. 
    Ms.Perry herself also stated on record that she had not been raped, assaulted, or drugged. 
     
    Lady Gaga's support for Kesha throughout her legal battle has been anything but secret, taking to her various social media accounts to advocate for the singer and helping Kesha continue to spread her message and shine her light as this lawsuit draws on. #FreeKesha

     
     

    Producer and indie veteran Lynette Howell Taylor talks about Lady Gaga & Bradley Cooper's 'A Star Is Born'

    As director Bradley Cooper’s high-profile remake debuts at the Venice Film Festival, producer and indie veteran Lynette Howell Taylor opens up about the one thing that star Lady Gaga insisted upon.
    Bradley Cooper's A Star 
Is Born, in which the actor makes his directorial debut starring opposite Lady Gaga, will be unveiled Aug. 31 at the Venice Film Festival before traveling to Toronto's fest and hitting theaters Oct. 5. The $36 million Warner Bros. release is the fourth telling of the time-tested showbiz love story (the first was in 1937) about a male star whose career nosedives while that of the female star he discovers rises — and for producer Lynette Howell Taylor, it is the most high-profile project of her career.
    A native of Liverpool, England, Howell Taylor, 39, first worked 
on stage productions for East of Doheny before 
segueing into independent film with such critical successes as Half Nelson, Blue Valentine and Derek Cianfrance's 2012 The Place Beyond the Pines, where she first collaborated with Cooper, who invited her to come aboard Star two years ago. Her new production company 51 Entertainment, which has three employees, has also partnered with Shivhans Pictures on the currently filming Wander Darkly, directed by Tara Miele and starring Sienna Miller and Diego Luna as a couple in the aftermath of a devastating car crash.
    She and husband Graham Taylor, co-president of Endeavor Content, live in Pacific Palisades with their young children, daughter Avery and son Atticus — and a third is on the way in October. But they don't spend much time talking shop, says Howell Taylor with a laugh. "With two children and soon a third, when we get home, we talk about schedules, who's going to be where and who takes what shift."
    Why is A Star Is Born such an enduring story?
    Ultimately, it's a love story, and audiences love to watch stories about love. It's also a love story told with music, which is why it is timeless and why it is fresh. The music is fresh to this generation, and each previous incarnation has very much been about that time period when the movie came out. So this new one stands alone as its own contemporary retelling.
    Even though you shot the film before the Time's Up movement, has the balance between the male and female characters changed?
    I don't think it changed the story. The movie is about a woman in a man's world. There are not a lot of women in the film, and that's by choice, because the music industry has been very dominated, especially behind the scenes, by men. That's very much a part of the 
contemporary telling of this story.
    You were the fifth producer to join the project. How did you each divide up roles?
    Jon Peters made the '70s version. Bill Gerber came on in 2009, and he had very much been spearheading it. Todd Phillips and Bradley are producing partners and have 
a wonderful creative collaboration. So we all collaborated and supported Bradley's vision. Each individual producer on any project could often do what the other producers are doing, but on any given day, you naturally fall into a rhythm — OK, today I'm going 
to sit with the first A.D. and do the schedule and you're going to deal with how to get Coachella to let us film there.
    Does working with a first-time director like Cooper change 
the dynamic for you as a producer?
    I've been working with first-time directors since I started. My first movie Half Nelson was with Ryan Fleck and Anna Boden. And I've worked with several actors turned directors, like Matt Ross and Brie Larson. What I love about actor-directors is they so fully understand what everybody needs in front 
of the camera. They're always so great at getting performances 
out of other actors because they really understand the craft.
    Lady Gaga hasn't had a lot of 
experience as an actor. Did you make any adjustments, like 
extra rehearsal time, for that?
    It was not about extra rehearsal time. It was about the environment that Bradley created on set that allowed everybody to bring the best that they had to give. All the music in the movie was sung live, which was something that Lady Gaga insisted on to have the most authenticity. Bradley fully embraced the idea and committed to it. And she was a real warrior. She performed both weekends at Coachella — and 
then we shot on their stages, 
and brought in our own crowds, during the week.
    Live Nation also produced — what was their involvement?
    It was a financial partnership on the movie. And music is such a huge part of the movie, there was an element of that, too, in terms 
of support.
    Did your background in indie film come into play?
    Obviously, it was very much 
a Warner Bros. movie, and you have the support of the Warner Bros. back office and the wonderful people who work at that studio. But then there's never enough money to make movies like this, and you have to get really creative — Bradley called Kris Kristofferson, who [starred in the 1976 version and] was performing at [the] Glastonbury [Festival], and asked if he could have part of his set, 
and Kris gave us four minutes. Bradley went with our cinematographer and one camera and our sound guy, and they went up on the stage and he performed a song twice, and 
it has a very electric feel to it. That was more in the spirit of independent filmmaking — beg, borrow and steal — and sometimes 
it makes the film feel more alive.
    With the emphasis on hiring more women and minorities, how was that reflected in your staffing?
    Bradley's a very inclusive filmmaker, so there was a lot of diversity on the set. That 
happened naturally. Our first 
A.D. was a woman, our costume designer, our production designer, our music supervisors were women. The area that needs to be addressed is on the union level. It's not that there aren't amazing, competent people available; it's that the unions in certain departments haven't caught up 
to that. If you're shooting a movie in Los Angeles and you want 
to hire a diverse, female location manager but the person you want is not in the union, the union 
is telling you to go through its list before you can hire a non-union person, and that list is full of men. There's your conundrum.
    Source

    EXCLUSIVE: 'A Star Is Born' Soundtrack Release Date

    Bradley Cooper and Lady Gaga's upcoming film with will be in theatres worldwide in less than 2 months, and we can exclusively reveal all the details about its soundtrack release. The soundtrack will feature all original music written specifically for the film, performed by both Lady Gaga and Bradley Cooper. 
     
    The 'A Star is Born' Soundtrack will be released on all digital platforms and also have a physical release. The digital version will contain 19 tracks, and the CD will also feature additional audio from the movie. Pre-orders will be available from the August 30th, and the worldwide soundtrack release is scheduled for October 5th. There are no plans to release any single before the movie release, also scheduled for October.
     
    Be sure to follow our team or me on Twitter for further updates.

    Lady Gaga and Bradley Cooper interviewed for EW's Fall

    Bradley Cooper was warned. Friends discouraged the American Sniper star from choosing A Star Is Born as his directorial debut.
    Aside from it being one of a handful of takes on the tragic romance, the project had stalled for years in Hollywood, attracting directors and stars like Clint Eastwood and Beyoncé, respectively. “I had a lot of people tell me, ‘Please don’t do this’ — people I respect and who care about me,” says Cooper, 43, on a hot afternoon in the Hollywood Hills while being interviewed for this week’s cover of Entertainment Weekly.

    “I just knew this could be the end of everything if it doesn’t work. It’s like, ‘Who’s this guy making the fourth [version] of this movie? Shut up already.’ But I still could not deny what I felt deep down, and that’s why it was this movie. It sort of ignited something in me.”
    The actor admits this is a story that’s been building in him since his childhood. “I used to write songs — that’s like the first time I’ve ever said that,” reveals Cooper.
    “I used to always hear verses and songs in my head as a kid. And I wrote a couple down. I’m talking from like [age] 8 to like 19. So I knew that there was something that I hadn’t pursued that maybe I could actualize one day in a movie.”
    Cooper’s Born, in theaters Oct. 5, charts the tumultuous relationship between alcoholic rock star Jackson Maine and burgeoning singer-songwriter Ally, played by pop icon Lady Gaga, 32. As Jackson falls deeper into addiction, Ally blazes a path toward superstardom. Much in the way Jackson helps lift Ally, Cooper has directed Gaga to her most accomplished and dramatic performance to date. “It just has changed me,” says Gaga of Born.

    “Watching Bradley work was phenomenal and then having him believe in me — it gave me more ammunition to believe in myself and I just feel so blessed to have had that experience.”
    Cooper, who also co-wrote the script with Eric Roth and Will Fetters, has reshaped the story into an exhilarating, emotional rock epic with electric performance scenes shot at real festivals like Coachella and Glastonbury.
    “I never wanted to be in the crowd,” says Cooper of his decision to have the cameras on stage with the actors. “I always wanted the audience to feel what it would be like if you were the person performing.”

    Born features a stirring original score (collaborators include producer Mark Ronson, singer Jason Isbell, and Willie Nelson’s son Lukas), a career-best performance from the actor, and — yes — a career-redefining role for Gaga.
    The film, which will world premiere at the Venice Film Festival, has already generated awards talk for its two leads. “I think the reason it’s so outstanding is because of the deal they made at the beginning,” explains producer Bill Gerber (Gran Torino). “She said, ‘People are gonna think you’re a rock star.’ And he said, ‘People are gonna think you’re an actress.’ They both accomplished what they said they would do.”
    The pair’s electricity on and off screen is undeniable as is their bond. “I think the biggest thing I learned is that sky’s the limit if you find a companion artistically, and you have a project,” says Cooper of working with Gaga.
    “There is no dreaming too big. What people can do together is so much more powerful than what they can do by themselves.” Adds Gaga, “I think what I learned from Bradley [is] it’s okay to be relentlessly sure of your vision, and to go after it with every fiber of your being, and to never stop white gloving what you’re making. Sometimes, as an artist, I second-guess myself when I go, ‘Am I pulling the thread? Am I unraveling the whole blanket now? Do I need to stop?’ It’s changed the way that I work today.”
    For much more with Gaga and Cooper, including their friendship and the day Barbra Streisand came to set, pick up the Fall Movie Preview issue of Entertainment Weekly on stands Friday. Watch the first interview below.
     
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    This article originally appeared here.

    Lady Gaga announces "Enigma" show in Las Vegas

    Lady Gaga’s Las Vegas residency will feature two unique shows in the intimate venue.
    LADY GAGA ENIGMA is a brand-new odyssey of her pop hits built as an experience unlike any other while LADY GAGA JAZZ & PIANO will feature stripped-down versions of her hits as well as music from the Great American Songbook.
    Members of Lady Gaga’s Little Monsters fan community will receive access to an exclusive pre-sale beginning Wednesday, Aug. 8 at 10 a.m. PT to Sunday, Aug. 12 at 10 p.m. PT.
    Citi is the official presale credit card of Lady Gaga’s residency at Park Theater. As such, Citi cardmembers will have access to purchase presale tickets from Thursday, Aug. 9 at 10 a.m. PT to Sunday, Aug. 12 at 10 p.m. PT thru Citi’s Private Pass® program.
    For complete pre-sale details, visit citiprivatepass.com. M life Rewards loyalty members as well as Live Nation and Ticketmaster customers will receive access to a presale scheduled from Saturday, Aug. 11 at 10 a.m. PT to Sunday, Aug. 12 at 10 p.m. PT. To join the M life Rewards program, or for more information, visit mlife.com.
    Tickets starting at $77.90 (not including applicable service charges or fees) go on sale Monday, Aug. 13 at 10 a.m. PT. A limited number of VIP packages including meet and greets also will be available. More infos here.
    “I can’t wait to share ENIGMA with all of my fans and with Las Vegas. We’re creating a show unlike anything I’ve done before. It will be a celebration of all that is unique and different within us. The challenges of bravery can be overcome with creativity and courage that is grown out of adversity, love and music.” – Lady Gaga
     
    Click here to buy the tickets
     
     
    First Confirmed Dates
    You can download the official poster below. Just click on the picture.

     

    Lukas Nelson talks about Lady Gaga & Bradley Cooper's 'A Star Is Born' and its music

    In a recent exclusive interview on GRAMMYs website, Lukas Nelson had some things to say about 'A Star Is Born'.
    "It was great, man. Bradley [Cooper] and [Lady] Gaga, I mean Bradley being a great musician and Gaga being a great actress, I'm really looking forward to seeing people's reactions to the movie and seeing how they like it. I think they really will. I think they'll like the music, it's all original that we wrote, and Promise Of The Real is in it. And there's music from Dave Cobb and Jason Isbell. Mark Ronson produced a bunch of stuff. And then Bradley's just so fantastic. I mean he put his heart and soul into it. So I'm really looking forward to when that comes out. "
    Source
     
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